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20-08-19

Being kind is more important than ‘having big muscles’ for being strong, poll claims

Compassion valued more than physicality in survey on 'true strength'

Being able to admit you are wrong, asking for help when you need it and being kind even when someone is rude or aggressive are among the signs someone is a “strong” person, according to a new poll. 

The survey of 2,000 British adults revealed the traits which defined true strength, include being supportive, putting your problems aside to help others and speaking up when someone is being mistreated.

They also valued compassion over physicality when it came to defining a “strong person”, with 43 per cent considering an act of kindness to be a sign of strength compared to just 10 per cent who said “having big muscles”.

Dr Emma Gray, a clinical psychologist, said: “It’s promising to see that these Britons do value characteristics of kindness when defining strength. Humans are programmed for emotional connection so showing compassion and performing acts of kindness should not be overlooked.”

She added: “When we’re kind, it releases oxytocin hormones which is why we feel better about being kind. Kindness, like exercise, releases endorphins, a phenomenon known as 'The Helper's High’. It also boosts serotonin, the neurotransmitter responsible for happiness and well-being.”

The poll, commissioned by deodorant and antiperspirant maker Soft & Gentle, also found almost three quarters of adults believed being kind made you stronger as a person.

The poll, commissioned by deodorant and antiperspirant maker Soft & Gentle, also found almost three quarters of adults believed being kind made you stronger as a person.

Source: Independent